Join Us! Take AP Micro and AP Macro in 2017-2018!

 

 

(click on image to view descriptions, college majors, careers and read flyer in detail)

 

AP Microeconomics is offered in the fall semester and studies the individual decision making process.

AP Macroeconomics is offered in the spring semester and studies the entire economic system.

  • How does a business maximize profits?
  • How much does that college education really cost?
  • Why should you stop eating when you’re full, even if you leave food on your plate

The Microeconomics course will address:

  • How and why people make individual decisions
  • The differences between efficient and inefficient types of markets (monopolies, oligopolies, perfect competition)
  • Supply and demand, product specialization, production possibilities and comparative advantage

The Macroeconomics course will address:

  • What are the causes and effects of inflation, unemployment and growth?
  • Why doesn’t the U.S. just make more stuff?
  • Why should I care about how much the government wants to spend?

See Mr. Miller in Room 114 or Mr. Rodman in Room 110 for more information.

College Majors & Economics? Check out all of the college majors in which having a course in AP Micro and/or AP Macro would be most helpful: https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/majors/social-sciences-economics

Careers Using Economics? Check out all of the career areas where a background in economics is advantageous: https://www.aeaweb.org/resources/students/careers

 

 

US construction spending hits more than 10-year high in November

U.S. construction spending rose more than expected in November, reaching its highest level in 10-1/2 years, which could provide a lift to fourth-quarter economic growth.

The Commerce Department said on Tuesday that construction spending increased 0.9 percent to $1.18 trillion, the highest level since April 2006. It was boosted by gains in both private and public sector investment

Read more at CNBC: US construction spending hits more than 10-year high in November

Construction spending in October was revised up to show a 0.6 percent rise instead of the previously reported 0.5 percent increase. Construction spending was up 4.1 percent from a year ago in November.

Read more at CNBC: US construction spending hits more than 10-year high in November