Twitter to Cut 9% of Workforce as Revenue Growth Slows – WSJ

Twitter Inc. posted another quarter of slowing revenue growth Thursday and said it would slash 9% of its global workforce, in its first report since recent takeover interest from potential suitors including Salesforce.com Inc. dissipated.

The social-media company’s revenue rose 8.2% to $615.9 million, its smallest gain and ninth straight period of slowing growth. Analysts expected revenue of $606 million.

Twitter recorded a loss of $102.9 million, or 15 cents per share. Excluding certain expenses such as stock-based compensation costs, Twitter posted a profit of 13 cents a share, compared with the average analyst estimate of 9 cents per share

Source: Twitter to Cut 9% of Workforce as Revenue Growth Slows – WSJ

Orders for U.S. Capital Goods Decline by Most Since February – Bloomberg

Orders for U.S. business equipment fell in September by the most in seven months, indicating corporate investment is having trouble gaining traction.

Bookings for non-military capital goods excluding aircraft dropped 1.2 percent, erasing a 1.2 percent August gain that was stronger than previously reported, Commerce Department data showed Thursday. The median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg called for a 0.1 percent drop. Demand for all durable goods eased 0.1 percent.

Source: Orders for U.S. Capital Goods Decline by Most Since February – Bloomberg

Why the good economy could be a problem for the next president – The Washington Post

The U.S. economy is delivering some of the best employment and income gains of the past 40 years, boosting workers in a way that recalls the boom years of the 1980s and 1990s.

But while the gains may help Hillary Clinton rebuff Donald Trump’s frequent attacks on the state of the nation and the Obama administration’s record, she would face a series of minefields if she wins the White House. As would Trump, if he pulls off a victory.

Economists say there is a one in five chance of recession next year. The Federal Reserve is on a march toward raising interest rates. And threats continue to flow from abroad, including the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union and other signs of turbulence in the global economy.

A recession — or even a decline in economic momentum — could rapidly expose the new president to criticism and change the ability of the new administration to accomplish its goals.

Source: Why the good economy could be a problem for the next president – The Washington Post